Quick Answer: Can You Explain Me?

Can u explain meaning?

verb (used with object) to make known in detail: to explain how to do something.

to make clear the cause or reason of; account for: I cannot explain his strange behavior..

Can you or will you?

May implies that you are asking for permission. Can implies that you are questioning somebody’s ability. Will implies that you are seeking an answer about the future.

Is it for you or to you?

‘For you’ – is used when you want to do something so that the person doesn’t have to do it himself / herself. You use it to benefit the person you’re talking to. You’re going to use it also to tell someone that you did something so they don’t have to do it. 1.

What are called in English?

There are 14 punctuation marks that are commonly used in English grammar. They are the period, question mark, exclamation point, comma, semicolon, colon, dash, hyphen, parentheses, brackets, braces, apostrophe, quotation marks, and ellipsis.

Can could tenses?

The verb can is used to say that someone or something is able to do something. … It doesn’t have all of the tenses that verbs usually have. It has the simple past tense could, but no past participle. When a past participle is needed, the expression be able to is used instead.

Can you please explain me?

Would you please explain it to me? If this is what you meant to write, then would means that you would like someone to explain it to you. Can, in context, would refer to if you can explain it. In other words, can sounds more demanding and would means it’s optional or something.

How do you explain to and for?

As you can see in #6, TO or FOR can be used for a motive/reason, but TO is always with a verb, and FOR is always with a noun.

Could you please help me meaning?

Could you help me is a polite way of saying “Will you please take the time to help me?” It should be said with a diffident smile, and delivered not as a demand, but as a request.

Can I use could for future?

We often use could to express possibility in the present and the future.

Can and could grammar?

Can, like could and would, is used to ask a polite question, but can is only used to ask permission to do or say something (“Can I borrow your car?” “Can I get you something to drink?”). Could is the past tense of can, but it also has uses apart from that–and that is where the confusion lies.

Can you and could you difference?

If taken literally, “Can you” is equivalent to asking the person if they’re capable of doing something. “Could you”, on the other hand, implies that the action can be completed under some circumstances by the person. The usage of can you is idiomatic, and hence, is more popular used phrase of the two.

Can you give me or could you give me?

“Could” is the polite form of “can”—so both are correct, but we use them in different situations. We use “can” when we are telling someone to do something. We use “could” when we are making a request.

Can you explain me or to me?

Well; they’re both correct, but mean two different things. “Explain me”: there’s something complicated about you that someone doesn’t understand. “Explain to me”: there’s something complicated that you don’t understand. It’s highly likely that for what you mean, that the latter is the correct wording to choose.

Is unexplainably a real word?

In a way or to an extent that cannot be explained.

Can you please send me or could you please send me?

There is probably no proper way. All are grammatically correct. Both are fine grammatically, but it appears that you are aiming for a relatively formal setting in which case “Could” is slightly more formal-sounding.

Can and could sentences examples?

Can Could 👍 with Many Examples ✅ CAN/COULD (AFFIRMATIVE)PAST SINGLE ACTION, STATIVE VERBShe could feel the wind on her face.PAST SINGLE ACTION, ACTION VERBNOT POSSIBLE!PRESENT ABILITYHe can speak Portuguese fluently.FUTURE ABILITY OR SKILLNOT POSSIBLE!3 more rows•Feb 26, 2013

What is the different between to and for?

It might seem complicated, but the answer is actually very simple. Use “to” when the reason or purpose is a verb. Use “for” when the reason or purpose is a noun.